Dental Poster Journal

Current Issue (Vol 9, NO. 2, July-December 2020 Issue)

14. POSTER

Sarah Thomas

Point of care testing in periodontal diagnosis- A new frontier

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1



Commentary:
Periodontal disease, a prevailing oral disease, is caused by oral microbe induced inflammation. The sustained inflammatory response to the microbial antigenic stimuli leads to progressive destruction of periodontal tissues. Conventional diagnostic methods including radiographs, allow the detection of periodontitis only when there is sufficient loss of the periodontium. At this stage, any treatment strategy would struggle to halt the disease progression. Thus, novel diagnostic tools capable of detecting subtle periodontal changes are required to infer early diagnosis and treatment1,2,3.
The past decade has developed several diagnostic tools to aid in monitoring the periodontal status using saliva and the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). The point of care (POC) diagnostics, is one such endeavor that allows rapid chair-side tests to diagnose periodontal disease using salivary and GCF samples. The present poster is an attempt to highlight the advantages of some of the point of care diagnostic kits and their possible limitations.

Keywords: Periodontitis; The point of care testing; Rapid chairside tests

How to cite this article: Thomas S.- Point of care testing in periodontal diagnosis- A new frontier- A Road Map, PosterJ 2020; 9(2):14.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.066

Conflict of interest: None declared


13. POSTER

Anila Krishna Saxena, Artika Gupta, Anil K. Tomer

Retrograde Filling Materials - Soldiers of Apex

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1



Commentary:
Successful periapical surgery mandates the elimination of periapical infection and a good apical seal1. The apical region of the root canal has the maximum lateral canals that may act as portal of entry for the ingress of irritants. During periapical surgery, the apical 3mm is resected and prepared to receive a retrograde filling material. Root end filling is the procedure through which an inert material is packed into the root canal via a retrograde approach2. The desirable characteristics of a root end filling material include biocompatibility, non-resorbable, radiopaque, easy to manipulate and capable of being closely adapted to the dentinal walls of the retrograde cavity3. Conventionally, amalgam, glass ionomer cement, super EBA were used as retrograde filling materials. Research has led to development of various newer biomimetic materials based on calcium silicate cements. The earliest of these was mineral trioxide aggregate. Newer materials include Biodentine, and Bioceramics like Endosequence and Bioaggregate. The present poster highlights the various retrograde filling materials used in dentistry.

Keywords:Bioceramics; Biodentine; Retrograde Filling Materials; Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

How to cite this article: Saxena A.K, Gupta A, Tomer A.K.- Retrograde Filling Materials - Soldiers of Apex, PosterJ 2020; 9(2):13.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.065

Conflict of interest: None declared


12. POSTER

Ayesha Niyaz, Shahul Hameed

Introduction to Imaging in Dental Implants- A Road Map

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1



Commentary:
The use of Dental Implants to treat complete and partial edentulous spaces has become an integral treatment modality in restorative dentistry. The basis for planning up an implant placement depends upon a clinical examination of the patient and by radiological evaluation. The main objective of diagnostic imaging is to assess bone quality and quantity which serves as a basic foundation for placing an implant1. Diagnostic imaging is categorized into 3 phases: pre-prosthetic/pre-surgical implant imaging, surgical & interventional implant imaging, and post-prosthetic implant imaging. The imaging modalities range from analog which uses x-ray films to intensifying screens as receptors for visualization of images to digital and two-dimensional imaging which provides us information of the height and width of the bone in that region, tentatively2. Further, three-dimensional imaging helps us to assess not only height and width but also depth/thickness of the particular area3. So in the current era of imaging, the practitioner plans up the imaging modality accordingly which gives them complete information before implant placement. In this poster presentation, we present the different implant imaging modalities with advantages and disadvantages, so the dentists get a brief overview of the same.

Keywords:Dental Implants, Implant Imaging, 2-Dimensional Imaging, 3-Dimensional Imaging

How to cite this article: Niyaz A, Hameed S.- Introduction to Imaging in Dental Implants- A Road Map, PosterJ 2020; 9(2):12.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.064

Conflict of interest: None declared


11. POSTER

Jayanta Saikia, Dipshikha Das

Lite image analysis module ‘A boon in the field of salivary diagnosis’

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1-2



Commentary:
Cancer, cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurological diseases disturb the bodily mechanism of an individual, causing a devastating impact on a global scale. Therefore, the diagnosis of such diseases at an early pace is important. An early diagnosis relies on both a thorough clinical evaluation and precise laboratory investigations. Most clinical samples are collected through invasive procedures. The past decade has seen a surge in the development of non-invasive salivary diagnostic1. In addition to local changes with the oral cavity, the salivary samples have also shown to exhibit alteration in response to several systemic diseases including cancer. They have also been used in forensics to screen for drugs2.

Keywords: Point of care diagnostics, Saliva, Oral disease, LIAM, Lateral Flow Test, VerOFy®, Super•SAL

How to cite this article: Saikia J, Das D.- Lite image analysis module: ‘A boon in the field of salivary diagnosis’, PosterJ 2020; 9(2):11.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.063

Conflict of interest: None declared


10. POSTER

Nowshiya M Ziauddin, Bikash Jyoti Borthakur, Swathika B, Ganesan S

3D printing- A futuristic tool

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1-2



Commentary:
3D printing is the process of making a solid object from a three-dimensional digital image by laying down many thin layers of building material1. It is also called additive manufacturing. Various methods of 3D printing in dentistry are stereolithography, photopolymer jetting, selective laser sintering, fused deposition modeling, selective laser sintering, etc2.
Steps involved in 3D printing are: (1) obtaining a 2D image using an intraoral camera/scanner. (2) converting a 2D image into a 3D image using the CAD software. (3) making 3D printed models using additive printers.

Keywords: CAD Software; 3D Printing; Dentistry; Endodontics

How to cite this article: Ziauddin N.M, Borthakur B. J, Swathika B, Ganesan S.- 3D printing- A futuristic tool , PosterJ 2020; 9(2):10.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.062

Conflict of interest: None declared


9. POSTER

Pawan Anil Pawar, Meenal Nitin Gulve, Swapnil Janardan Kolhe, Gayatri Balasaheb Aher

Advanced injectable scaffold system signpost for development in endodontic tissue regeneration

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1-2



Commentary:
Tissue engineering is a reassuring approach for dentin-pulpal complex regeneration. Tissue regeneration consists of three factors: stem cells, growth factors, and scaffolds. The scaffold is an artificial extracellular matrix (ECM) which serves as a template for cell growth and tissue regeneration1. Required properties of scaffolds are they ought to be biocompatible, biodegradable, have specific physical and mechanical properties, and have to mimic the in-vivo environment. According to shape, scaffolds are of two types: preformed scaffolds and injectable scaffolds. Preformed scaffolds have the previous form whereas injectable scaffolds can be injected into destined space and form shape of in situ structure2. Considering tiny form and size of the root canals injectable scaffolds are additionally appealing than that of preformed ones in endodontics3. Recently certain bio-inductive materials are added into synthetic scaffolds for obtaining superior outcomes.

Keywords: Endodontics; Injectable Scaffolds; Regenerative Endodontics; Tissue Engineering

How to cite this article: Pawar P. A, Gulve M. N, Kolhe S. J, Aher G. B.- Advanced injectable scaffold system: signpost for development in endodontic tissue regeneration., PosterJ 2020; 9(2):9.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.061

Conflict of interest: None declared


8. POSTER

Shruthi Jayachandran

Start treasuring your health from home-post lockdown precautions

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1



Commentary:
COVID-19 protocols and guidelines are intended to direct the public towards health awareness, disease control. These protocols aid the health care workers1 (HCW) and medical professionals to effectively halt the disease spread in the society. Moving on to the health security and home care for patients under the suspicion of COVID-19, presenting with signs and symptoms, more precautions have to be taken for proper sanitation to prevent infection with the COVID-19 virus2. Other recommended measures include self-hygiene, including immune boosters through diet, proper garbage disposal, house sanitation, etc. A person suffering from mild symptoms where hospitalization may not be recommended due to overstressing on the health care sector. If the patients have systemic disorders, or immunocompromised conditions, where the risk rate of infection and COVID- 19 related complications are higher, further protective measures, early diagnosis, and treatment planning are of utmost importance.

Keywords: COVID-19; Health Care Worker; Sanitation

How to cite this article: Jayachandran S.- Start treasuring your health from home-post lockdown precautions, PosterJ 2020; 9(2):8.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.060

Conflict of interest: None declared


7. POSTER

Harshitha K, Ajay Rao H.T, Sham.S.Bhat, Tasneem Shajahan

Feed right for your baby’s smile!

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1-2



Commentary:
Breastfeeding bestows long term and short term benefits on both the child as well as the mother which has beneficial effects on the development of an infant's oral cavity. Many studies reveal that infants who are breastfed regularly are less prone to have caries in their first months of life than an infant who is not breastfed regularly1. Successful breastfeeding means proper swallowing and latch-on by an infant. The proper breastfeeding position, “Latch-on”, they are the cradle hold, the cross over the hold, clutch hold and reclining position. So during an effective “Latch-on” tongue extends over the lower gum pad by drawing from both areola tissue and nipple into the mouth. This creates a tight seal and the lip flanges outward over the areole tissues. When the seal remains intact, the infant obtains milk by using a peristaltic motion of tongue to compress the flattened breast nipple against palate which moves the milk towards the throat and helps the infant to swallow and to gain nutrition. This normal swallowing habit helps to set a pattern for correct normal swallow habits into adulthood2.

Keywords: Breastfeeding; Infant Oral Hygiene; Latch On

How to cite this article: Harshitha K , Rao A.H.T, Bhat S.S, Shajahan T.- Feed right for your baby’s smile!, PosterJ 2020; 9(2):7.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.059

Conflict of interest: None declared


6. POSTER

Shefaly Tandon, Shalini Garg, Anil Gupta, Shikha Dogra, Sakshi Joshi , Ankit Srivastava

Save a tooth-The herbal way in parent’s perspective

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1



Commentary:
Aim: To assess the awareness and attitude of parents choosing routine natural edible ingredients for posttraumatic tooth preservation.
Material and methods: A questionnaire-based survey was conducted amongst parents of children in the mixed dentition period with erupted young permanent incisors. The questionnaire collected demographics, parent’s choice of natural ingredients available at home (coconut water-CW, aloe vera-AV, egg white-EW, green tea-GT, pomegranate juice- PJ) which can be used as a preservation medium for the avulsed tooth. The survey also evaluated knowledge and attitude questions about tooth preservation after trauma.
Results: Most of the parents were dissatisfied with their knowledge and were willing to attend educational programs related to the management of dental trauma1. Coconut water2,3 was found to be the natural medium of choice in a significant number of parents followed by aloe vera4.
Conclusion: Coconut water, a scientifically established tooth preservation media was the parent’s first choice for storing the tooth. There is a growing need for parent awareness programs explaining emergency management for traumatic dental injury.

Keywords: Avulsion; Coconut Water; Herbal Storage Media; Parental Awareness.

How to cite this article: Tandon S, Garg S, Gupta A, Dogra S, Joshi S, Srivastava A.- Save a tooth-The herbal way in parent’s perspective, PosterJ 2020; 9(2):6.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.058

Conflict of interest: None declared


5. POSTER

Bhumika Gumber, Anjali Kothari, Rajinder Kumar Sharma, Shikha Tewari, Ritika Arora

Laterally displaced flap along with subepithelial connective tissue graft for root coverage of isolated gingival recession in thin biotype patients: A report of 4 cases

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1



Commentary:
Introduction: Management of marginal tissue recession in patients with thin biotype presents a challenge on a day to day practice in periodontics. Laterally displaced flap (LDF) has been modified multiple times since its introduction. It can be used in combination with other procedures like subepithelial connective tissue (SECT) graft1,2.
Objective: To present a series of cases with thin biotype and gingival recession at the labial surface of tooth who were treated with LDF along with SECT graft.
Methodology: Patients with Millers class II gingival recession were recruited for the study. The recession coverage was done with LDF along with SECT graft. Clinical parameters including recession depth and width, the width of keratinized gingiva, gingival index, and plaque index were assessed at baseline and after 1 and 3 months after surgery.
Results: Treatment led to complete root coverage, and an increase in width of the attached gingiva.
Conclusion: The results demonstrated that the combination of LDF with SECT graft is promising for treating recession cases in thin biotype for obtaining the expected root coverage and esthetic outcome.

Keywords: Biotype; Esthetic; Graft, Laterally Displaced Flap; Root Coverage

How to cite this article: Gumber B, Kothari A, Sharma R.K, Tewari S, Arora R.- Laterally displaced flap along with subepithelial connective tissue graft for root coverage of isolated gingival recession in thin biotype patients: A report of 4 cases, PosterJ 2020; 9(2):5.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.057

Conflict of interest: None declared


4. POSTER

Yunus Ahmed

Smartphone-based analytical biosensors

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1-2



Commentary:
What does point-of-care technology mean? It refers to a patient being diagnosed by a doctor or self- diagnosis without the requirement of a laboratory. Biosensors are tools that are used to perform this function. For many years, the biosensors used were heavy and difficult to manage. Therefore, they could be used only where it was feasible. Now, smartphone-based biosensors are developed which can easily be connected to a smartphone which allows the operator to carry out various functions at ease, due to its portability and also compile data from anywhere1. Due to the proximity of these devices to the patient, it helps the patient monitor long-standing diseases and actively participates in improving their health2. Wearable biosensors are considered to be the future of healthcare due to its precision, expense, and accessibility3.

Keywords: Oral Health, Oral Health Promotion, Special Needs

How to cite this article: Ahmed Y.- Smartphone-based analytical biosensors, PosterJ 2020; 9(2):4.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.056

Conflict of interest: None declared


3. POSTER

Yunus Ahmed

COVID-19 and dental practice

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1



Commentary:
All dentists should ascertain the need for immediate care, of each patient via telephone by asking a set of questions to probe into the risk of exposure of the patient to Covid-191.

Keywords: Aerosols; COVID-19; Coronavirus; Dentist; Pandemic

How to cite this article: Ahmed Y.- COVID-19 and dental practice, PosterJ 2020; 9(2):3.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.055

Conflict of interest: None declared


2. POSTER

Madhura Chandrashekhar Mahajan, Manjushri Waingade

Personalized medicine: ‘Hope for better tomorrow’

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1-2



Commentary:
“If it were not for the great variability among individuals, medicine might as well be a science and not an art.”Sir William O sler In humans, 99.9% of genetic bases are similar while only the remaining 0.1% make a person unique. These variations can be harmless, harmful, or latent1,2. Personalized or customized medicine is a developing area in which physicians apply diagnostic tests to identify particular biological markers, environmental factors that aid in describing which all medical/ dental modalities will work best for each patient according to his or her genetic makeup1,3. It also includes fighting the diseases with your immune cells. You can’t get more personalized than that!4-6.It aims to reduce the burden of disease, focuses on prevention, diminishes the duration and severity of illness, reduces side effects of unnecessary drugs, health care costs, and what not? Although personalized medicine in the medical field is rapidly growing and becoming more common, in dentistry it is in a primitive stage. It would be beneficial as an oral medicine practitioner to determine the appropriate drug to the appropriate patient for the appropriate disease at the appropriate time with the appropriate dosage 2,4,6,7. In the last two decades, there have been many advances in genetics, proteomics, metabolomics, molecular biology, and molecular medicine. Personalized medicine uses these advances along with clinical profiles as well as other relevant data to customize the health care services. Personalized medicine is sometimes also labeled as stratified medicine, as patients are stratified based on available information, and then therapy is customized according to the characteristics of each stratum3. To discriminate from stratified medicine, personalized medicine is more about the individual rather than strata. Personalized Medicine provides a structural and functional model for efficient health care services; which is preventive, well-coordinated, and proven1. In next decade, everyone will be having their detailed information and nobody will have to suffer through trial -and-error care5,6,8 . Personalized medicine approach should have potent clinical benefit, means layer by layer distribution of information should be feasible and should lead to better clinical practice. A critical element of the success of personalized dentistry is awareness of public and acceptance of personal genome sequencing along with its risks and benefits2-4.

Keywords: Personalized Medicine, Personalized Dentistry, Genomics, Proteomics.

How to cite this article: Mahajan M.C, Waingade M.- Personalized medicine: ‘Hope for better tomorrow’, PosterJ 2020; 9(2):2.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.054

Conflict of interest: None declared


1. POSTER

Soumya Muraleedharan, Praveen Jodalli, Rekha P Shenoy, Laxminarayan Sonde, Imran Pasha

Changing perception of oral health

Year:2020 | Month:July-December | Volume:9 | Number:2 | Pages No:1



Commentary:
In India majority of people believe that oral health is less important and separate from general health. This perception needs to be changed at local, state, and national levels and for all population groups. It is our moral responsibility to implement oral health programs equally in all urban and rural populations. All stakeholders, policymakers, health care providers as well the public should come together to implement and bring about change in the perception of oral health. This poster depicts the measures and how the combined effort of public, policymakers, and health care providers can bring a change in their oral health perception. Addressing and overcoming multiple barriers to oral health care, which can embody issues or disparities in: education, economics, the surroundings, cultural and social problems, and also the health care system itself1. To change the perception of oral health firstly we must educate the public, stakeholders or policymakers who can influence and implement training programs, conduct surveys, population-based research, and develop a stronger health care infrastructure. Policymakers should implement oral health policies. Special care and education should be given to pregnant ladies, lactating mothers, and elderly people. Oral health has limited integration into medical education hence it becomes mandatory to change the perception of health providers and promote as well implement interdisciplinary training. A combined cumulative effort by the public, policymakers and health care providers can give a new vision to oral health2.

Keywords: Oral Health, Oral Health Promotion, Special Needs

How to cite this article: Muraleedharan S, Jodalli P, Shenoy RP, Sonde L, Pasha I.- Changing perception of oral health, PosterJ 2020; 9(2):1.

Source of support: Nil.

DOI: 10.15713/ins.dpj.053

Conflict of interest: None declared